White Woman’s Memoir

Join me!

This is the place for you if

  • You want to learn about what it’s like to be white in the United States and to adapt to a community of color.
  • You’re becoming a part of a different community from the one you grew up in.
  • You’re white and you want to know you’re not alone in trying to figure out what that means.
  • You like what you see.

Most Recent Post

The House My Mother-in-Law Lived In

The House My Mother-in-Law Lived In

My mother-in-law lived the first five years of her life in a sharecropper’s cabin: two 15×15 rooms, one on top of the other, inadequate heat, no air conditioning — and the reason I understood even a little how hard it would have been is because I lived in a similar place myself…

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Does calling myself white seem racist?

If it seems weird to you, or even racist, that I’m calling myself “white,” you’re not alone. A lot of people think that.

For most of my life, I wouldn’t have called myself white at all. Yet I’ve grown to realize that it’s not pejorative or racist, it’s a simple fact about who I am. Just as I see gender and age, I see race. It’s a simple fact about people.

Why I’m writing this memoir

I’m writing this memoir because I’m a white woman who fell in love with and married an African-American man. I probably wouldn’t have realized how important exploring race was if I hadn’t fallen in love with Kyle (my husband).

As someone who is curious about people and constantly learning, I want to explore the world of my husband, his family, and their community.

I want to fit in with my new Southern, black, socially conservative, small-town, churchgoing family — me, an unchurched liberal white Pacific Northwesterner from a big city. Read more on the About page.

 

A Memoir You Might Like

Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis, by J. D. Vance.

If you want to understand white, rural America, this memoir is a good place to start. Especially given that Donald Trump is now President of the United States.

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